Monthly Archives: October 2014

Filmmaker Spotlight: Joe Ippolito

Posted on October 28, 2014

Joe Ippolito
SFTFF: What is the name of your film?

JI: Growing Old Gracefully: The Transgender Experience.

SFTFF: What was the inspiration for your film?

JI: When I turned 40, I looked around and thought, “man, I don’t feel prepared for growing older.” Then, I started talking to other trans people, and many of them felt the same way. Upon further investigation, many of the challenges faced by trans and gender non-conforming people, as they grow older, started to become clear. At that point I thought, what can I do to start the process of educating others about this? Because Gender Reel, the film festival I founded, was already in full swing, I figured making a film would be the most direct process possible. Thus GOG was born.

SFTFF: Descrive your film in 3 words.

JI: Informative, Interesting and Scary.

SFTFF: What is one thing you learned from making your film?

JI: How to be a filmmaker. I had no idea going in what this process entailed, and I learned a ton about the filmmaking process.

SFTFF: If your film had to be summed up in one song, what song would it be?

JI: “Heros” by David Bowie.


Filmmaker Spotlight: Jen Crothers

Posted on October 28, 2014

Jen Crothers

SFTFF: What is the name of your film?

JC: Sissy

SFTFF: What was the inspiration for your film?

JC: Trying to understand my gentle masculinity.

SFTFF: Descrive your film in 3 words.

JC: Cute, quirky, DIY

SFTFF: What is one thing you learned from making your film?

JC: My sound editing skills jumped significantly thanks to my friend Tim.

SFTFF: If your film had to be summed up in one song, what song would it be?

JC: That song does not exist.


We’re back at The Roxie!

Posted on October 14, 2014

We were so excited last year to be in this fabulous space that we decided we just HAD to come back!  After all, the SF Transgender Film Festival was born at The Roxie in 1997 (then called the Tranny Fest).

But The Roxie has been around for quite some time.  It’s the longest running cinema in the US, and the second oldest in the world!  It opened in 1909 as the C. H. Brown Theater and has gone through quite a few identity changes since then.  While it always been a small, neighborhood theater, it had its moments as a home for Russian-language films, and even nude and openly erotic films!

Since 1979, The Roxie has been a hub of underground, artistic, and queer film.  It showcased titles like The Life and Death of Frida Kahlo by David and Karen Crommie, and Rosa von Praunheim’s It is Not the Homosexual Who Is Perverse, but the Situation In Which He Lives.  The 80s and 90s were devoted to retrospectives, revivals, and films too extraordinary for your average theater.

In 2009, The Roxie became a nonprofit.  Since then it has “has doubled-down on its iron-willed dedication to showcase the coolest/weirdest/most-thought provoking films of the past, present and future” (www.roxie.com).  The Roxie has many awesome programs, from a Japanese film series to its annual film noir festival.  The Roxie is committed to creating a unique and affordable moviegoing experience.

It’s no wonder we love it here!